The Inefficiency of Words.

Terms like “robust” and “awesome” get us out of explaining, but they also get us out of thinking.

Courtesy of Instagram

Humans tend to use terms liberally to get out of explaining things.

There’s a laziness to inefficient words. We use them because they’re handy. It’s probably why we joined “nevertheless” together. What’s the point of having a handy word if it’s so hard to say? The same could be said of “Wassup?” Why have a singular noun when you can make it a full sentence?

News by its definition is always “breaking,” and who’s “startled” anymore when 289 people are shot in the U.S. each day?

When they’re not opening their pie holes, newscasters like Wolf Blitzer have their own assortment of inefficient words like “startling” and “breaking.” News by its definition is always “breaking,” and who’s “startled” anymore when 289 people are shot in the U.S. each day?

At least Trump has added new terms like “fake news,” something we all suspected, but it’s good to hear it from someone with a flattened beehive.

Inefficient words make it too easy. They fit into texts and short Twitter copy (which is good for Trump). They keep us from rambling (even better for Trump). They confine us to mundane truths.

I did a poor imitation of Don Draper for 40 years before writing my first novel. I'm currently in the final stages of a children's book. Lucky me.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store